Bitcoin core wallet RPC console commands - Bitcoin-qt ...

An SPV (thin) client, like Multibit, with bitcoind/bitcoin-cli commands?

As the blockchain gets bigger, more and more people will opt for a thin client, but some Bitcoin users need bitcoind commands for their automated services. Is the full client the only way to use these commands, or is there an SPV client out, or being developed, with similar functionality?
submitted by aminok to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Creamcoin 0.18.0.0 – following Bitcoin’s tale

Creamcoin 0.18.0.0 – following Bitcoin’s tale

06/08/2019 3 min read📷216SHARES216VIEWSShare on Twitter
When new Creamcoin was designed, we had in mind not only a coin that would hold parity with any cryptocurrency, but something that would demonstrate the extra-special capabilities of a decentralized ledger, capable to introduce, help and bring it further to the regular people. Blockchain developing is unstoppable complex process with endless possibilities. Integration of applications on such a technology could achieve better, secure pass of value.
0.18.0.0

On August 5th, 2019 Creamcoin code was successfully updated to the latest Bitcoin version 0.18.0
https://github.com/creamcoin/cream/
With this latest release, we proved that Creamcoin itself it’s not a sort of a tenant to the Bitcoin. Much easier to apply and to pursue the main purpose of existence and to create further innovations in our Cream Line. The new release brings tremendous performance improvements, as well as integration will be much easier for any platform, exchange or integrator. Wallets are available to Releases tab on github
WALLETS

Multi-wallet support

Cream Core now supports loading multiple, separate wallets. The wallets are completely separated, with individual balances, keys and received transactions. Multi-wallet is enabled by using more than one -wallet argument when starting Creamcoin, either on the command line or in the Cream config file. In Creamcoin-Qt, only the first wallet will be displayed and accessible for creating and signing transactions. GUI selectable multiple wallets will be supported in a future version. This feature will continue to be refined with later updates, as there are still some known issues in using the GUI to access the “multiwallet” command. The most notable is that you can’t use coin control features with multiple wallets loaded, or else you will likely retain the wrong wallet when attempting to switch wallets.
When running Cream Core with multi-wallet, wallet-level RPC methods must specify the wallet for which they’re intended in every request. HTTP RPC requests should be send to the :/wallet// endpoint, for example 127.0.0.1:8332/wallet/wallet1.dat/. bitcoin-cli commands should be run with a -rpcwallet option, for example [bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet=wallet1.dat getbalance] A new node-level [listwallets] RPC method is added to display which wallets are currently loaded. Starting command for both wallets should look like this: [creamd -daemon -wallet=wallet1.dat -wallet=wallet2.dat]

Hardware Wallet native compatibility

With a new release of Cream Core the possibility is added in the form of use hardware wallets (Ledger, Trezor, Digital BitBox, KeepKey, Coldcard), but this process is manual and involves the use of Hardware Wallet Interaction (HWI) tool and it needs HW support and addition of Cream in the future, which is not excluded from roadmap. This is a great news for everyone who use Cream Core, and want extra security. Only applies to those who can use command line/CLI (for now), and when some of Hardware wallets actually supports Cream.

SegWit 4MB limit

SegWit replacing the block size limit with a block “weight” limit, allowing up to 4 megabytes of transaction data, and giving a substantial boost in the transaction capacity of the Cream network.

www.creamcoin.com

In the same with the new code update, Creamcoin Team is doing major shifting power, migrating the marketing and promotion activities, from our news site cream.technology to our main page www.creamcoin.com. We will come up with additional statement in this matter, so our supporters and followers have better perspective of Cream Line and the products of it.
In the meantime we are looking into new ways that developers can enhance the capabilities of the Creamcoin protocol, integration of decentralized exchange functionality, lightning network and number of other options that would allow for different types of conditional sends of Creamcoin assets. We are inviting any individual, platform, exchange or integrator who would like to submit recommendations or feature requests, feel free to contribute to the Creamcoin Github.
By Cream Team
submitted by creamcointeam to u/creamcointeam [link] [comments]

Power of the Command Line (bitcoin-cli, hwi, electrum, trezorctl)

I think some of the console tools available with HW wallets today are greatly under utilized. Here's a quick write-up on how to create and sign a TXN very similar to 43d27...1fc06 found on the SLIP-14 wallet. I'll be using TrezorCTL, Electrum, and HWI for the signing. I won't go much into the setup or install, but feel free to ask if you have questions about it. Note, you don't have to use all three of these. Any one will produce a valid signed TXN for broadcast. I just showed how to do it three ways. Whats more some of the Electrum and HWI steps are interchangeable.
ColdCard also has a utility called ckcc that will do the sign operation instead of HWI, but in many ways they are interchangeable. KeepKey and Ledger both have libraries for scripted signing but no one-shot, one-line console apps that I know of. But HWI and Electrum of course work on all four.

TrezorCTL

This is the what most would think of to use to craft and sign TXNs, and is definitely very simple. The signing uses a script called build_tx.py to create a JSON file that is then used by the btc sign-tx command. The whole process is basically:
  1. tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
This just means, take the output of build_tx and sign it. To copy 43d27...1fc06, I wrote a small script to feed build_tx, so my process looks like:
  1. ~/input.sh | tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
But it's all very simple. Note... I used TrezorCTL v0.12.2 but build_tx.py version 0.13.0 1.

input.sh

```

!/bin/bash

secho() { sleep 1; echo $*}
secho "Testnet" # coin name secho "tbtc1.trezor.io" # blockbook server and outpoint (below) secho "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00:0" secho "m/84'/1'/0'/0/0" # prev_out derivation to signing key secho "4294967293" # Sequence for RBF; hex(-3) secho "segwit" # Signature type on prev_out to use secho "" # NACK to progress to outs secho "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3" # out[0].addr secho "10000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu" # out[1].addr secho "20000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x" # out[2].addr secho "99999694" # out[2].amt secho "" # NACK to progress to change secho "" # NACK to skip change secho "2" # txn.version secho "0" # txn.locktime ```

Electrum

Electrum is one of the better GUI wallets available, but it also has a pretty good console interface. Like before you need your Trezor with the SLIP-14 wallet loaded and paired to Electrum. I'll assume Electrum is up and running with the Trezor wallet loaded to make things simple.
Like with TrezorCTL, Electrum feeds on a JSON file, but unlike TrezorCTL it needs that JSON squished into the command line. This is a simple sed command, but I won't bore you with the details, but just assume that's done. So the process in Electrum (v4.0.3) looks like:
  1. electrum serialize (create psbt to sign)
  2. electrum --wallet signtransaction (sign said psbt)
Still pretty simple right! Below is the JSON I smushed for #1

txn.json

{ "inputs": [{ "prevout_hash":"e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "prevout_n": 0, "value_sats": 129999867 }], "outputs": [{ "address": "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3", "value_sats": 10000000 },{ "address": "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu", "value_sats": 20000000 },{ "address": "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x", "value_sats": 99999694 }]}

HWI

HWI is an unsung hero in my book. It's a very small clean and simple interface between HW wallets and Bitcoin Core. It currently supports a good range of HW wallets. It keeps itself narrowly focused on TXN signing and offloads most everything else to Bitcoin Core. Again, I'll assume you've imported your Trezor keypool into Core and done the requisite IBD and rescan. And if you don't have the RPC enabled, you can always clone these commands into the QT-console.
To sign our TXN in HWI (v1.1.2), we will first need to craft (and finalize) it in Bitcoin Core (0.21.1). Like in Electrum, we will have to use simple sed to smush some JSON into command arguments, but I'll assume you have that covered. It will take an inputs.json and an outputs.json named separately.
  1. bitcoin-cli createpsbt (create psbt)
  2. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= walletprocesspsbt (process psbt)
  3. hwi -f signtx (sign psbt)
  4. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= finalizepsbt (get a signed TXN from psbt)
A little more involved, but still nothing too bad. Plus this gives you the full power of Bitcoin Core including integrations with LND (lightning).

inputs.json

[{ "txid": "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "vout": 0 }]

outputs.json

[{ "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3": 0.10000000 },{ "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu": 0.20000000 },{ "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x": 0.99999694 }]

Conclusion

This may all seem like very low level coding, but is surprisingly simple once you get a knack for it. Whats more, all these platforms support testnet which allows you to practice with valueless coins until you get the hang of it. And, like many things in bitcoin, this is all (mostly) python, which is one of the easier languages to learn.
Enjoy
Footnotes
1 - https://github.com/trezotrezor-firmware/issues/1296
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to check if a bitcoin transaction is correctly signed?

I would like a generic solution to the problem of verifying that a raw transaction is correctly signed. Normally, one can just use bitcoin-cli testmempoolaccept and if the answer is true, the transaction is fit to enter the mempool (and therefore correctly signed).
However, this only works for new transactions to be included in the blockchain, I would like a more generic solution that works for already confirmed transactions and transactions that might spend transactions not yet in the mempool.
With some work I think I could come up with some validation method for P2PKH transactions. For example, for this transaction, I could use something like bitcoin-cli verifymessage 1LBCr8dpZV3fSj3ha1DihMHSvqR3S53jLN , where rawTx can be obtained by bitcoin-cli getrawtransaction and signature from the scriptSig field of the decoded raw transaction. However, this only works for P2PKH transactions. There are probably ways to adapt this to P2SH and segwit outputs but this seems a lot of work to do for every scenario (with different sighash values etc). Isn't there a set of bitcoin-cli commands or some code snippet out there that does this already? Some kind of command that reverses/verifies the output of bitcoin-cli signrawtransactionwithwallet .
submitted by johnturtle to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Power of the Command Line (bitcoin-cli, hwi, electrum, trezorctl)

I think some of the console tools available with HW wallets today are greatly under utilized. Here's a quick write-up on how to create and sign a TXN very similar to 43d27...1fc06 found on the SLIP-14 wallet. I'll be using TrezorCTL, Electrum, and HWI for the signing. I won't go much into the setup or install, but feel free to ask if you have questions about it. Note, you don't have to use all three of these. Any one will produce a valid signed TXN for broadcast. I just showed how to do it three ways. Whats more some of the Electrum and HWI steps are interchangeable.

TrezorCTL

This is the what most would think of to use to craft and sign TXNs, and is definitely very simple. The signing uses a script called build_tx.py to create a JSON file that is then used by the btc sign-tx command. The whole process is basically:
  1. tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
This just means, take the output of build_tx and sign it. To copy 43d27...1fc06, I wrote a small script to feed build_tx, so my process looks like:
  1. ~/input.sh | tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
But it's all very simple. Note... I used TrezorCTL v0.12.2 but build_tx.py version 0.13.0 1.

input.sh

```

!/bin/bash

secho() { sleep 1; echo $*}
secho "Testnet" # coin name secho "tbtc1.trezor.io" # blockbook server and outpoint (below) secho "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00:0" secho "m/84'/1'/0'/0/0" # prev_out derivation to signing key secho "4294967293" # Sequence for RBF; hex(-3) secho "segwit" # Signature type on prev_out to use secho "" # NACK to progress to outs secho "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3" # out[0].addr secho "10000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu" # out[1].addr secho "20000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x" # out[2].addr secho "99999694" # out[2].amt secho "" # NACK to progress to change secho "" # NACK to skip change secho "2" # txn.version secho "0" # txn.locktime ```

Electrum

Electrum is one of the better GUI wallets available, but it also has a pretty good console interface. Like before you need your Trezor with the SLIP-14 wallet loaded and paired to Electrum. I'll assume Electrum is up and running with the Trezor wallet loaded to make things simple.
Like with TrezorCTL, Electrum feeds on a JSON file, but unlike TrezorCTL it needs that JSON squished into the command line. This is a simple sed command, but I won't bore you with the details, but just assume that's done. So the process in Electrum (v4.0.3) looks like:
  1. electrum serialize (create psbt to sign)
  2. electrum --wallet signtransaction (sign said psbt)
Still pretty simple right! Below is the JSON I smushed for #1

txn.json

{ "inputs": [{ "prevout_hash":"e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "prevout_n": 0, "value_sats": 129999867 }], "outputs": [{ "address": "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3", "value_sats": 10000000 },{ "address": "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu", "value_sats": 20000000 },{ "address": "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x", "value_sats": 99999694 }]}

HWI

HWI is an unsung hero in my book. It's a very small clean and simple interface between HW wallets and Bitcoin Core. It currently supports a good range of HW wallets. It keeps itself narrowly focused on TXN signing and offloads most everything else to Bitcoin Core. Again, I'll assume you've imported your Trezor keypool into Core and done the requisite IBD and rescan. And if you don't have the RPC enabled, you can always clone these commands into the QT-console.
To sign our TXN in HWI (v1.1.2), we will first need to craft (and finalize) it in Bitcoin Core (0.21.1). Like in Electrum, we will have to use simple sed to smush some JSON into command arguments, but I'll assume you have that covered. It will take an inputs.json and an outputs.json named separately.
  1. bitcoin-cli createpsbt (create psbt)
  2. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= walletprocesspsbt (process psbt)
  3. hwi -f signtx (sign psbt)
  4. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= finalizepsbt (get a signed TXN from psbt)
A little more involved, but still nothing too bad. Plus this gives you the full power of Bitcoin Core including integrations with LND (lightning).

inputs.json

[{ "txid": "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "vout": 0 }]

outputs.json

[{ "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3": 0.10000000 },{ "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu": 0.20000000 },{ "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x": 0.99999694 }]

Conclusion

This may all seem like very low level coding, but is surprisingly simple once you get a knack for it. Whats more, all these platforms support testnet which allows you to practice with valueless coins until you get the hang of it. And, like many things in bitcoin, this is all (mostly) python, which is one of the easier languages to learn.
Enjoy
Footnotes
1 - https://github.com/trezotrezor-firmware/issues/1296
submitted by brianddk to TREZOR [link] [comments]

Power of the Command Line (bitcoin-cli, hwi, electrum, trezorctl) (x-post from /r/Bitcoin)

submitted by ASICmachine to CryptoCurrencyClassic [link] [comments]

Power of the Command Line (bitcoin-cli, hwi, electrum, trezorctl)

submitted by 5tu to BitcoinTechnology [link] [comments]

Error 32601 after updating full node to 0.15

Hello,
I have a full node that was running the 0.14.1 UASF core client, it was still downloading the chain.
I have upgraded it to the 0.15 client, and when I start the bitcoind daemon, I get the following error:
error code: -32601 error message: Method not found
I have compiled the client with the --enable-upnp-default --disable-wallet --with-gui=no flags.
I have done some research and that error is related to the wallet function, which should be disabled. Any thoughts?
Edit: solved. As cgminer kindly pointed out, the -32601 was from the bitcoin-cli command itself, not the server. The getinfo option is no longer supported in 0.15. read below for conclusions.
submitted by crypto_loco to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Issues Creating an Isolated Regtest OB Market

Hi guys!
I'm helping set up a internal training class on cryptocurrency for my company and I thought it would be pretty neat to set up a working OB marketplace to get folks more familiar with using bitcoin. The catch is that it has to completely isolated since our training lab isn't allowed to be hooked up to the wider internet and I believe that's causing some problems. So far I have two OpenBazaar serveclients in regtest mode with built-in BTC wallets set up on an internal network that can see each other and a few other bitcoin nodes I've set up. I can send bitcoin to both OB wallets using bitcoin-cli commands but when I try to use bitcoins in the client itself, I run into a number of issues:
What element(s) of the OpenBazaar infrastructure am I missing? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
submitted by cud_county to OpenBazaar [link] [comments]

Easy UASF Node in Debian VM tutorial

So if you have a moderately powerful gaming desktop with a Quad-Core CPU like an i5 or better and 8+GB of RAM, you can easily run your own little UASF node in the background. Once it's done syncing with the network, you won't even notice it's there. Here's how.
You will need :
The following assumes you know how to install Linux in a Virtual Machine
Step I. - Installation. Go through expert install and set up a base system with only ssh server enabled. For partitioning, you can do just one big disk and everything in one partition, but if you happen to have a computer that has both SSD's and HDD's, it would be optimal to create two virtual disks and use a small one for the OS on the SSD and a larger one on the HDD in a custom mount point for the blockchain. Reboot and ssh into the server.
Step II. - Build requirements. A few things need to be taken care of. First, you'll want to edit the /etc/network/interfaces file and set up a static IP. Once that's done, stop by your router and make sure that traffic on port 8333 is forwarded to your debian VM. Then, install some packages we need :
apt update apt upgrade apt install build-essential autoconf libssl-dev libboost-dev libboost-chrono-dev libboost-filesystem-dev libboost-program-options-dev libboost-system-dev libboost-test-dev libboost-thread-dev libevent-dev git libtool pkg-config 
The next one is a bit more annoying. We need Berkeley DB 4.8, and it's a little old. It's packages are in the Debian Squeeze archives, so in the /etc/apt/sources.list file, we need to add :
deb http://archive.debian.org/debian/ squeeze main 
Then remember to update again, and install the thing :
apt install libdb4.8++-dev libdb4.8-dev 
If you intend to also throw on xorg and a UI, you will want Qt as well. Otherwise skip this last step.
install libqt4-dev libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libqrencode-dev 
Step III. - Build time
#Starting from /home/yourUser git clone https://github.com/UASF/bitcoin.git -b 0.14-BIP148 cd bitcoin ./autogen.sh ./configure make make install 
That's it! Well, mostly. Start it with
bitcoind -daemon -disablewallet -datadir=/whereveyou/want/youblockchain 
...and wait about thirty hours to sync with the network. You may want to visit the /whereveyou/want/youblockchain directory and create a permanent bitcoin.conf in there. To enable RPC calls to the server and get it to accept bitcoin-cli commands you'll want to use it to create a usepassword and copy that to your user's /.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf.
Minimal bitcoin.conf example
daemon=1 listen=1 disablewallet=1 server=1 rpcuser=bob rpcpassword=bob's password 
Security I recommend you disable password login and use private key authentication only on ssh, and also restrict iptables rules to the bare minimum that must be allowed for this application. You will need this in your iptables script :
# Allows BITCOIN traffic from anywhere -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 8333 -j ACCEPT # Allows RPC calls to the bitcoin server from localhost -A INPUT -p tcp -s 127.0.0.1 --dport 8332 -j ACCEPT 
Useful ressources :
submitted by the_bolshevik to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

BDUI - Bitcoind - Bitcoin Daemon User Interface

Hey everyone :)
I've created a user interface in VB6 for Bitcoind that anyone can download and use for FREE !!!
I have called it "BDUI - Bitcoin Daemon User Interface"
The VB6 source code is also included in the install folder !!!
I will do my best to maintain and improve BDUI as best as I can - feedback etc very much appreciated.
I have a website for my projects that I am also slowly updating...
Please go to - http://www.X7E.co.uk - thanks.
I have done a demo / tutorial vid on my YouTube Channel that I hope will be of use also...
Please go to - https://youtu.be/WJy09BjLY0k - thanks
Here is a link to a pic of the main screen of BDUI - http://www.x7e.co.uk/Projects/BDUI/Pics/BDUI-1.jpg
Sonix711

BDUI - Bitcoind - Bitcoin Daemon User Interface

FREEWARE SOFTWARE AND FREE VB6 SOURCE CODE !!! :)
Created by Sonix711
Website: http://www.X7E.co.uk

Description:

At its lowest common denominator, BDUI is a User Interface for Bitcoind that uses .bat files to run Bitcoin-cli commands against the local Bitcoind application and display the output information to the user in a readable and trackable format. The use of .bat files makes the application functionality highly customisable from within the application itself.

This application will show you:

BDUI Install Folder: C:\X7E\BDUI

This folder ( C:\X7E\BDUI ) is hardcoded into the application as the .bat files in the BATFILES folder are required for most of the underlying functionality to work correctly.
The .bat files in the BATFILES folder can all be customised within BDUI to perform various tasks as required.
Please feel free to contact me about anything BDUI or Bitcoin / CryptoCurrency related... Actually, if I can help, I will always try, so feel free to contact me as required... :)
This project is still being developed, so please remember that, thanks.
Also, my VB knowledge is still quite basic, although I am working hard to improve it for this project and future projects... :)
Comments, Question & Suggestions Welcome...
Share & Share alike !!!
If others hadn't shared questions, answers, and most importantly, VB code, this project and Application would not exist !!!
Check out the Websites list for all the sites that I used to help create this Application !!!
Thanks for using and supporting BDUI, Bitcoin & CryptoCurrencies !!! :)
Sonix711

submitted by Sonix711 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin-core on Windows with Tor: RPC cookiefile can be found no more. What do?

Hello, people who are smarter than me. I've been looking for an answer to this question with no success; hopefully my ignorance is another person's easy fix.
I started running my instance of bitcoin-core through Tor, but can no longer use bitcoin-cli commands. When trying I receive this error: error: Could not locate RPC credentials. No authentication cookie could be found, and no rpcpassword is set in the configuration file
is there a process I can go through to make bitcoin-core utilize cookiefile authentication? And if not, can you please tell me how to authenticate an rpcuser and rpcpassword if defined in bitcoin.conf?
Thanks for your help!
submitted by Andabatarian to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How do I set the maximum relayed block size?

I looked on the BU website, read though bitcoin-cli help, and searched the tarball and found no configuration instructions.
How can I set the maximum relayed block size without using the GUI? Is there a bitcoin-cli command or something I can set in bitcoin.conf? Someone please drop me a hint.
EDIT: If there are any configuration instructions in the git repo I can't find them.
submitted by 1s44c to bitcoin_unlimited [link] [comments]

where can i get the latest version of command list of `bitcoin-cli`?

I tried command like getaccount, as listed in https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Original_Bitcoin_client/API_calls_list.
but is deprecated when i use it in Bitcoin Core v0.17.0
> bitcoin-cli getaccount 18e9LCujZeNvdYh9WRcavPD2gizcNNB7rK error code: -32 error message: getaccount is deprecated and will be removed in V0.18. To use this command, start bitcoind with -deprecatedrpc=accounts. 
submitted by jasonzhouu to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

@gpuhot: @bitcoin_v Doing your -cli command I get this error in debug log: ERROR: AcceptBlock: unexpected-witness, ContextualCheckBlock : unexpected witness data found (code 16)

submitted by AltCash to altcash [link] [comments]

Lightning network CLI command /r/Bitcoin

Lightning network CLI command /Bitcoin submitted by cryptoallbot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

Lightning network CLI command /r/Bitcoin

Lightning network CLI command /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

[Programming, Bitcoin Core Full Node]Should bitcoind or bitcoin-cli getinfo commands take a long time to run?

Oracle Virtual Box Host - Windows 10 Guest - Ubuntu 17.04 Dedicate Ram ~12gb
When I first open Ubuntu and enter the terminal, commands such as those in the title take a long time to run. In fact, I still don't know how long they actually take because I end up terminating the process before it finishes. Is this normal, or is there something I can do?
submitted by ILIKEWHATUGOT to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Show Ethereum and Bitcoin price in command line interface (CLI)

Show Ethereum and Bitcoin price in command line interface (CLI) submitted by shaoping to ethereum [link] [comments]

I wrote a CLI for running interactive commands against Bitcoin-QT, if anyone is interested.

I did this to get a better understanding of bitcoin, as well as learn some coding. I'm not sure if something like this exists. I've never worked with curses before, so this was a good learning experience for me.
It runs the commands against the server with curl, as I couldn't quickly figure out the jsonrpc python library, and the curl was working. This would be an easy replacement, if the need arises, but it works as is.
I put in a whole bunch of features, including history, storing command output in buffers to use in subsequent commands, command abbreviations, and a whole lot more.
You can do something like:
> store getaccount 
# gets account associated with address and stores it to clipboard (CB) > getbalance CB # replaces CB with account from previous command
I didn't set out to write something for the community, but if there is any interest, I can put some more work into it and make it friendlier. This means there's no real documentation. But I would imagine that most people wouldn't run a bitcoin script without going through the code somewhat anyway.
There are basic instructions for how to get started at the top of the file.
This is still, very much, a work in progress. If you have any questions, comments, critiques, etc, let me know.
http://pastie.org/5562643
EDIT: it does seem that there is some interest in this. I'll try to formalize it a bit and document it. Feel free to make any suggestions and I'll take them into account.
submitted by althepal to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Programming, Bitcoin Core Full Node]Should bitcoind or bitcoin-cli getinfo commands take a long time to run? /r/Bitcoin

[Programming, Bitcoin Core Full Node]Should bitcoind or bitcoin-cli getinfo commands take a long time to run? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Is there a command to get mempool size from bitcoin–cli?

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submitted by pinhead26 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to mine bitcoins (solo mining) with the core client ... How to give your bitcoin node commands using a web server How to mine Bitcoin Using Linux [2019] - YouTube Console miner minergate with cmd 9. bitcoind

Bitcoin is open-source; its design is public, nobody owns or controls Bitcoin and everyone can take part. Through many of its unique properties, Bitcoin allows exciting uses that could not be covered by any previous payment system. Fast peer-to-peer transactions. Worldwide payments. Low processing fees Scenario: Michael receives 0.05000000 BTC from Pablo and another 0.01000000 BTC from Kuradang. Michael also wants to send 0.02500000 BTC to Berteng. Each amount that Michael receives has the These commands are accurate as of Bitcoin Core version v0.14.0. Command Description -? Print this help message and exit -version : Print version and exit -alertnotify=<cmd> Execute command when a relevant alert is received or we see a really long fork (%s in cmd is replaced by message) -blocknotify=<cmd> Execute command when the best block changes (%s in cmd is replaced by block hash ... Listing my bitcoin addresses. Listing the bitcoin addresses in your wallet is easily done via listreceivedbyaddress. It normally lists only addresses which already have received transactions, however you can list all the addresses by setting the first argument to 0, and the second one to true. Accounts are used to organize addresses. Full list Introduction¶. The following guide aims to provide examples to help you start building Bitcoin-based applications. To make the best use of this document, you may want to install the current version of Bitcoin Core, either from source or from a pre-compiled executable.. Once installed, you’ll have access to three programs: bitcoind, bitcoin-qt, and bitcoin-cli.

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How to mine bitcoins (solo mining) with the core client ...

#bitcoin #cpumining #minergate #vgamining #mining #miningcrypto #cryptocurrency #duririau #bitcoingold pastekan ke notpad (minergate-cli -user [email protected] -bcn 2 ) ganti email dengan email ... *****UPDATE***** Solo mining has been removed from client. I'll keep the video up for how it used to work, it might still work for some alt coins (unsure) yo... bitcoin-cli and bitcoind - Breaking Down Bitcoin Ep. 2 - Duration: 45:01. Casa Code 4,453 views. 45:01. HD Wallets - Why Your Seed Phrase Is Not Enough - Duration: 17:01. m1xolyd1an 456 views. 17 ... This video will demonstrate how to mine bitcoin in Linux. MINERGATE LINK: https://minergate.com/a/e13126b573b894c64393990a Bitcoin Donation : 3HNH19ss5Fd1j8j... New RPC commands: - getblockchaininfo - getblockcount - getpeerinfo - getconnectioncount - stop Linux terminal new stuff: watch * All other commands have been covered in previous videos www ...

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